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Full text of "Record of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill [serial]"

RECORD OF 
THE UNIVERSI 
• NORTH CAR 
AT CHAPEL Hll 




HE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
Sixteen Constituent Institutions 



WILLIAM CLYDE FRIDAY, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., President 

RAYMOND HOWARD DAWSON, B.A., MA, Ph.D., Vice President— Academic 
Affairs 

HAROLD DELANEY, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Vice President— Student Services and 
Special Programs 

HERMAN BROOKS JAMES, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Vice President— Research and 
Public Service 

L FELIX JOYNER, A.B., Vice President— Finance 

CAMERON P. WEST, A.B., M.A., Ed.D., Vice President— Planning 

GEORGE ELDRIDGE BAIR, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Educational Television 

JAMES L JENKINS, JR., A.B., Assistant to the President 

JOHN P. KENNEDY, JR., S.B., B.A., M.A., J.D., Secretary of the University 

ARNOLD KIMSEY KING, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Assistant to the President 

RICHARD H. ROBINSON, JR., A.B., LL.B., Assistant to the President 

ALEXANDER HURLBUTT SHEPARD, JR., M.A., Assistant Vice President- 
Finance and Treasurer 

J. LEM STOKES II, A.B., M.Div., Ph.D., Associate Vice President— Academic 
Affairs 

The University of North Carolina was chartered in 1789 and opened its doors to 
students in 1795. It has been governed by a Board of Trustees chosen by the 
Legislature and presided over by the Governor. During the period 1917-1972, the 
Board consisted of one hundred elected members and a varying number of 
ex-officio members. 

By act of the General Assembly of 1931, without change of name, it was 
merged with The North Carolina College for Women at Greensboro and The 
North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh to form 
a multicampus institution designated The University of North Carolina. 

In 1963 the General Assembly changed the name of the campus at Chapel 
Hill to The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and that at Greensboro 



to The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and, in 1965, the name of the 
campus at Raleigh to North Carolina State University at Raleigh. 

Charlotte College was added as The University of North Carolina at Charlotte 
in 1965, and, in 1969, Asheville-Biltmore College and Wilmington College became 
The University of North Carolina at Asheville and The University of North 
Carolina at Wilmington respectively. 

A revision of the North Carolina State Constitution adopted in November 
1970 included the following: "The General Assembly shall maintain a public 
system of higher education, comprising The University of North Carolina and 
such other institutions of higher education as the General Assembly may deem 
wise. The General Assembly shall provide for the selection of trustees of The 
University of North Carolina. . . ." In slightly different language, this pro- 
vision had been in the Constitution since 1868. 

On October 30, 1971, the General Assembly in special session merged, with- 
out changing their names, the other ten state-supported senior institutions into 
the University as follows: Appalachian State University, East Carolina Univer- 
sity, Elizabeth City State University, Fayetteville State University, North Caro- 
lina Agricultural and Technical State University, North Carolina Central Uni- 
versity, North Carolina School of the Arts, Pembroke State University, Western 
Carolina University, and Winston-Salem State University. This merger became 
effective on July 1, 1972. 

The Board of Trustees became the Board of Governors and the number was 
reduced to thirty-five members (thirty-two after July 1, 1973) elected by the 
General Assembly. It is "responsible for the general determination, control, 
supervision, management, and governance of all affairs of the constituent 
institutions." However, each constituent institution has a local board of 
trustees of thirteen members, eight of whom are appointed by the Board of 
Governors, four by the Governor, and one, the elected president of the student 
body, whose principal powers are exercised under a delegation from the Board 
of Governors. 

Each institution has its own faculty and student body, and each is headed 
by a chancellor as its chief administrative officer. Unified general policy and 
appropriate allocation of function are effected by the Board of Governors and 
by the President with other administrative officers of the University. The 
General Administration office is located in Chapel Hill. 

The chancellors of the constituent institutions are responsible to the Presi- 
dent as the chief administrative and executive officer of The University of North 
Carolina. 



1973 





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UNIVERSITY CALENDAR* 
1973-1974 



SUMMER SESSION, 1973 
I First Term 

May 30, Wednesday 
I May 31, Thursday 

June 1, Friday 

June 4, Monday 
1 July 3, Tuesday 
I July 4, Wednesday 
I July 5-6, Thursday-Friday 

Second Term 

j July 9, Monday 

I July 10, Tuesday 

I July 11, Wednesday 

1 August 11, Saturday 

i August 13-14, Monday-Tuesday 

FALL SEMESTER, 1973 

; August 22, Wednesday 
i August 23-24, Thursday-Friday 
; August 27-29, Monday-Wednesday 
i August 30, Thursday 

November 21, Wednesday, 1:00 P. M. 
j November 26, Monday, 8:00 A.M. 
j December 7, Friday 
I December 8-10, Saturday-Monday 
i December 11-20, Tuesday-Thursday 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1974 

January 7, Monday 
; January 8, Tuesday 
j January 9, Wednesday 
I March 11, Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

March 18, Monday, 8:00 A.M. 
i April 25, Thursday 

April 26-28, Friday-Sunday 

April 29-May 8, Monday-Wednesday 
! May 12, Sunday 



Opening day. 

Registration. 

First day of classes. 

Last date for late registration. 

Last day of classes for first term. 

Holiday— Reading Day. 

Examinations according to schedule. 



Registration. 

First day of classes. 

Last day for late registration. 

Reading Day. 

Examinations according to schedule. 



Fall Semester opens. 

Freshman orientation, testing. 

Registration. 

First day of classes. 

Thanksgiving vacation begins. 

Instruction resumed. 

Last day of classes. 

Reading Days. 

Final examinations. 



Spring Semester opens. 

Registration. 

First day of classes. 

Spring vacation begins. 

Instruction resumed. 

Last day of classes. 

Reading Days. 

Final examinations. 

Commencement. 



*Tentative dates. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/recordofuniversi784univ 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL 

NELSON FEREBEE TAYLOR, LLB., Chancellor 

CLAIBORNE STRIBLING JONES, Ph.D., Assistant to the Chancellor 
SARAH VIRGINIA DUNLAP, B.S., Secretary of the University 
DONALD ARTHUR BOULTON, Ed.D., Dean of Student Affairs 
JOSEPH COLIN EAGLES, JR., J.D., Vice Chancellor, Business and Finance 
LYLE VINCENT JONES, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School and Vice Chancellor 
LILLIAN YOUNGS LEHMAN, Ph.D., Registrar and Director of Institutional Re- 
search 

JOHN CHARLES MORROW III, Ph.D., Provost 

CHARLES MILTON SHAFFER, B.S. Comm., Director of Developmental Affairs 
CECIL GEORGE SHEPS, M.D., Vice Chancellor, Health Sciences 

THE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

EDWARD G. HOLLEY, Ph.D., Dean 

JEAN FREEMAN, A.B. (L.S.), B.A., Assistant to the Dean 

The Administrative Board 1 2 

EDWARD G. HOLLEY, Ph.D., Dean 

RAYMOND L. CARPENTER, JR., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Library Science 
(1973) 

MYRL L. EBERT, M.S., Associate Professor of Library Science, Division of Health 
Sciences Librarian and Professor of Librarianship (1974) 

WILLIAM S. FLASH, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Public Health Administration 
and Assistant Dean of the School of Public Health (1972) 

KENNETH D. SHEARER, JR., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Library Science (1975) 

JOHN W. THIBAUT, Ph.D., Alumni Distinguished Professor of Psychology (1974) 

WILLIAM S. WELLS, Ph.D., Kenan Professor of English (1973) 

Faculty and Staff 

EDWARD G. HOLLEY Dean of the School of Library Science 

and Professor of Library Science 
B.A., 1949, David Lipscomb College; M.A., 1951, George Peabody College; 
Ph.D., 1961, University of Illinois. 

SUSAN GREY AKERS Professor and Dean, Emeritus (1954) 

A.B., 1909, University of Kentucky; Certificate, 1913, Library School, 
University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 1932, University of Chicago. 

LUCILE KELLING HENDERSON Professor and Dean, Emeritus (1960) 

A.B., 1917, Whitman College; B.L.S., 1921, New York State Library School. 



1. The Chancellor and the Provost are ex officio members of the Administrative 
Board. 

2. Terms expire the year indicated. 



8 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

LOUIS ROUND WILSON Professor, Emeritus (1959) 

A.B., 1899, A.M., 1902, Ph.D., 1905, LL.D., 1934, University of North 
Carolina; Litt.D., 1932, University of Denver; LL.D., 1932, Haverford 
College; L.H.D., 1949, Catawba College. 

BUDD LESLIE GAMBEE Professor of Library Science 

A.B., 1940, University of Rochester; A.B.L.S., 1941, M.A.L.S., 1949, Ph.D., 
1963, University of Michigan. 

CHARLES HAYNES McMULLEN Professor of Library Science 

A.B., 1935, Centre College of Kentucky; B.S. in L.S., 1936, M.S., 1940, 
University of Illinois; Ph.D., 1949, University of Chicago. 

MARY W. OLIVER Professor of Law and Library Science 

and Law Librarian 

A. B., 1940, Western Maryland College; B.S. in L.S., 1943, Drexel Insti- 
tute of Technology; LL.B., 1951, University of North Carolina. 

JERROLD ORNE Professor of Library Science 

B. A., 1932, M.A., 1933, University of Minnesota; Certificat, 1935, Sorbonne, 
Paris; Ph.D., 1939, University of Chicago; B.S., 1940, University of 
Minnesota. 

HERMAN HENRY HENKLE Visiting Professor of Library Science 

A.B., 1928, Whittier College; M.A. in L.S., 1933, University of California 
at Berkeley; Litt.D., 1961, Whittier College. 

JOE W. KRAUS Visiting Professor of Library Science 

A.B., 1938, Culver-Stockton College; B.S. in L.S., 1939, LS. M.A., 1941, 
Ph.D., 1960, University of Illinois. 

RAYMOND L. CARPENTER, JR Associate Professor of Library Science 

and Research Associate in the Institute for Research in Social Science 

A. B., 1949, St. Lawrence University; M.A., 1951, M.S. in L.S., 1959, Ph.D., 
1968, University of North Carolina. 

MYRL LUA-FRANCES EBERT Associate Professor of Library Science, 

Division of Health Sciences Librarian and Professor of Librarianship 

B. S., 1943, B.S. in L.S., 1945, Peabody College; M.S., 1951, Columbia 
University. 

DORALYN JOANNE HICKEY Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.A., 1951, Rice University; M.A., 1953, Presbyterian School of Christian 
Education; M.L.S., 1957, Rutgers University; Ph.D., 1962, Duke University. 

MARGARET ELLEN KALP Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.A., 1936, Douglass College; M.A. in L.S., 1942, University of Michigan. 

GERTRUDE LONDON Associate Professor of Library Science 

and Research Associate in the Institute for Research in Social Science 
Diplome de Professeur de Francais a I'Etranger, 1934, Docteur de 
I'Universite de Paris, 1935, Sorbonne, Paris; Academic Post-graduate 
Diploma in Librarianship, 1959, University College, University of London. 

FLORENCE ELLA BLAKELY Visiting Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.A., 1943, Presbyterian College; B.S. in L.S., 1945, M.A. in L.S., 1960, 
George Peabody College. 



The School of Library Science 



9 



NANCY W. BUSH Visiting Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.S., 1953, West Chester State College; M.S., 1963, Advanced M.S., 1969, 
Ph.D., 1971, Florida State University. 

MATTIE U. RUSSELL Visiting Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.A., 1937, M.A., 1940, University of Mississippi; Ph.D., 1956, Duke Uni- 
versity. 

MARTIN DILLON Assistant Professor of Library Science and Computer 

Science; Research Associate in the Institute for Research in Social Science 
B.S., 1961, Canisius College; Ph.D., 1967, State University of New York 
at Buffalo. 

iFRANCES HUNT HALL Assistant Professor of Library Science 

B.A., 1940, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A., 1955, M.S. 
in L.S., 1957, J.D., 1959, University of North Carolina. 

FRED WILBURN ROPER Assistant Professor of Library Science 

A. B., 1960, M.S. in L.S., 1962, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 
Ph.D., 1971, Indiana University. 

KENNETH DECKER SHEARER, JR Assistant Professor of Library Science 

and Research Associate in the Institute for Research in Social Science 

B. A., 1959, Amherst College; M.L.S., 1963, Ph.D., 1969, Rutgers University. 

SHIRLEY LOUISE AARON Visiting Assistant Professor of Library Science 

B.A., 1961, University of Southwestern Louisiana; M.S., 1965, Advanced 
M.L.S., 1971, Florida State University. 

WARREN PHILIP BIRD Visiting Assistant Professor of Library Science 

B.S., 1956, Georgetown University; M.S., 1964, Columbia University. 

JEAN FREEMAN Lecturer in Library Science and 

Assistant to the Dean 
A.B. (L.S.), 1933, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; B.A., 1958, 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

RUTH ELAINE STONE Lecturer in Library Science 

A. B., 1932, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.S.L., 1954, 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

MARGARET SANGSTER PARROTT Visiting Lecturer in Library Science 

B. A., 1947, North Texas State University; M.S. in L.S., 1957, University 
of North Carolina. 

CAROL S. NIELSEN Librarian of the School of Library Science 

B.A., 1971, Hartwick College; M.L.S., 1972, State University of New York 
at Albany. 

JAYNE CASTLE-KRENTZ Research Assistant 

B.A., 1970, University of California at Santa Cruz; M.A., 1971, San Jose 
State University. 

LINDA CHAMBERLAIN Secretary 

BARBARA A. S. HARRISON Secretary 

B.A., 1971, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

FRANCES McCOY Secretary 

1. Resigned, August 31, 1972. 



10 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND ASSISTANTSHIPS, 
1972-1973 

H. W. Wilson Company Scholarship in Library Science 

SUSAN KAYE HECHT, B.A., 1967, University of Michigan. 

Carnegie Service Scholarships 

NANCY LOUISE KUTULAS, B.A., 1972, Meredith College. 
JUNITH SMITHERMAN MARTINIERE, B.A., 1969, Vanderbilt University. 
MARGARET ANN TYNER, B.A., 1972, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
DOR IN DA KAY WADDELL, B.A., 1972, Pfeiffer College. 

University Scholarship Committee Scholarship 

ALICE MARTIN TAYLOR, B.A., 1972, Duke University. 

I 

Susan Grey Akers Scholarship 

DEBORAH KAY WEBSTER, B.A., 1972, University of Alabama. 
University Graduate Assistantships 

SARA SEBASTIAN ECKARD, B.A., 1970, Smith College. 

ROBERTA ANN ENGLEMAN, B.A., 1968, University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro; M.A., 1970, Duke University. 

YUN-FUN LAI, B.A., 1966, University of Hong Kong. 

ANDREA LEE LEHRKE, B.A., 1968, Ohio State University. 

KAREN ELIZABETH LONG, B.A., 1969, Wittenberg University. 

JOHN FREDERICK O'BRYANT, B.A., 1971, Southwestern University at Memphis. 

WILMOTH LORETTA PEAIRS, B.A., 1968, William Smith College; M.A., 1971, 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

KATHRYN ANN PLASKETT, B.A., 1971, University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro. 

VIRGINIA CRANE REEVES, 1970, Agnes Scott College. 

JANE DYER SMITH, B.S., 1968, Virginia Commonwealth University. 

NORMAN KENT SPURLING, B.A., 1970, College of William and Mary. 

SIBYL ANN STURGIS, B.A., 1969, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; 

M.A.T., 1970, University of South Carolina. 
SUSAN MARY AKERSTROM TARR, B.A., 1970, Westminster College. 
CHRISTINE WENDEROTH, B.A., 1971, Oberlin College. 

MARIAN WESTON, B.A., 1971, State University of New York at Binghamton. 
MARY HELEN WILLHITE, B.S., 1971, Central Michigan University. 



The School of Library Science 



11 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was chartered by 
the General Assembly of the state in 1789, and the cornerstone of 
the first building was laid in 1793. Formal opening exercises were 
held in January 1795, and the first student arrived in February of 
that year. Courses in library science were first offered during the 
regular and summer sessions in 1904. The School of Library 
Science was opened in 1931; it was the fourth professional school 
to be established by the University. The School's founding was 
aided by an initial grant of $100,000 from the Carnegie Corporation; 
a second grant of the same amount was provided by the Corpora- 
tion in 1940 as an endowment fund for the School. 

The School of Library Science is accredited by the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools. Its master's degree program 
is accredited by the American Library Association, and the School 
is an institutional member of the Association of American Library 
Schools. The Seminar in Medical Librarianship has been approved 
by the Medical Library Association. 

The classrooms, offices, and library of of the School occupy 
spacious air-conditioned quarters in Manning Hall. The library 
science collection in that building includes professional literature 
and collections of materials to support courses in the selection of 
literature for adults, young people, and children. 

Library school students also use materials in the University's 
main collection in Wilson Library, nearby, and in the various depart- 
mental libraries on the campus. The collections contain more than 
two million volumes; the library system ranks among the thirty 
largest academic libraries in the United States. Of particular inter- 
est for library school students are the fine collections of reference 
and bibliographic aids in various subjects; there are significant 
holdings of incunabula, finely printed books, and manuscripts. 

Graduate students of the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill are eligible to use and borrow library materials directly from 
North Carolina State University at Raleigh, The University of North 
Carolina at Charlotte, The University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro and Duke University. In addition, direct transportation of 
inter-library loans from Duke University and North Carolina State 
University is provided three times a week. 

Students enrolled in the graduate library science program are 
also permitted to register for graduate courses at the other cam- 
puses of the University and at Duke University. 



12 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Students of all races are equally welcome in the University of 
North Carolina. Persons of all racial backgrounds may apply for and 
accept admission, confident that the policy and regular practice of 
the institution will protect them from discrimination. 

LIBRARY CAREERS 

Librarianship today offers varied and challenging opportunities. 
Librarians are needed in public, school, college, and university 
libraries and in special libraries serving business, industry, and the 
scientific community. In recent years, a particular need has arisen 
for library and information specialists who are knowledgeable in 
matters of information transfer and computer manipulation of data, 
and who can serve as systems analysts for research libraries. 

A person will find a library career rewarding if he has a broad 
background of general knowledge, intellectual curiosity, and a de- 
sire to be of help to others. For many kinds of library and infor- 
mation work, one or more of these are helpful: strong preparation 
in one subject field, a good knowledge of modern foreign languages, 
and familiarity with computer techniques. 

PROSPECTIVE SCHOOL LIBRARIANS 

Students who plan to become school librarians should take such 
courses in education as will meet the minimal requirements for 
the teacher's certificate, as set by their regional accrediting associ- 
ation and their state department of education. 

PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The School of Library Science offers a thirty-nine semester hour 
program leading to the degree of Master of Science in Library Sci- 
ence. The basic program is designed to prepare students for 
service in the general field of librarianship; the core of required 
courses is described on page 35. In addition, courses and sequences 
are provided within the degree program for students who wish to 
prepare themselves for more specialized work. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR SPECIALIZATION WITHIN THE GRADUATE PROGRAM 

Increasingly, library science students are seeking to develop special 
competencies within their profession, utilizing both graduate and 
undergraduate experiences to meet a particular need. The areas 



The School of Library Science 



13 



and courses listed below exemplify, but do not exhaust, the possi- 
bilities for structuring a program emphasizing certain fields of 
librarianship. 

The Administration of Acadamic Libraries 

Basic Library Science courses: 

LIBS 231 Theory of Library Administration. 

LIBS 232 Scientific Management of Libraries. 

LIBS 255 Automating Information Systems. 

LIBS 262 Library Resources and Collections. 
Related courses are available in these disciplines: business 
administration, education, and sociology. 

The Administration of Public Libraries 

Basic Library Science courses: 

LIBS 231 Theory of Library Administration. 

LIBS 232 Scientific Management of Libraries. 

LIBS 255 Automating Information Systems. 

LIBS 262 Library Resources and Collections. 
Related courses are available in these disciplines: business 
administration; education; journalism; political science; radio, 
television and motion pictures; and sociology. 

Archives and Manuscripts 

Basic Library Science course.- 

LIBS 344 Administration of Archives and Manuscript 
Collections. 
Related Library Science courses: 

LIBS 228 Public Documents. 

LIBS 251 Advanced Cataloging and Classification. 

LIBS 255 Automating Information Systems. 
The Department of History offers a full range of graduate 
studies in British and American history, relevant to the work of 
the archivist and the manuscript librarian. North Carolina State 
University also offers the following sequence — 

HIST 551 History and Principles of the Administration 
of Archives and Manuscripts. 

HIST 552 Application of Principles of Administration 
of Archives and Manuscripts. 

Art 

Basic Library Science course: 

LIBS 345 Seminar in Fine Arts Librarianship. 



14 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



Related Library Science courses: 

LIBS 105 History of Books and Printing. 

LIBS 215 Bibliography. 

LIBS 224 Humanities Literature. 

The Department of Art offers a full range of graduate studies in 

art history and criticism. 

Audio-visual and Non-book Materials 

Basic Library Science course: 

LIBS 125 Non-book Materials as Library Resources. 
Related Library Science course: 

LIBS 145 Instructional Materials Center: Organization 
and Administration. 
Related courses are available in these disciplines: education; 
journalism; and radio, television and motion pictures. 

Bio-Medical Sciences 

Basic Library Science course: 

LIBS 348 Seminar in Medical Librarianship. 
Related Library Science courses: 

LIBS 222 Science Literature. 

LIBS 228 Public Documents. 

LIBS 255 Automating Information Systems. 
A knowledge of modern languages, especially of German and 
Russian, is helpful, as is knowledge of computer science and 
the history of science. 

Children's and Young People's Services 

Basic Library Science courses: 

LIBS 122 Selection of Books and Related Materials 

for Young People. 
LIBS 123 Selection of Books and Related Materials 

for Children. 

LIBS 221 Reading Interests and Guidance of Youth. 
LIBS 241 Administration and Supervision of Public 

School Library Systems (for school 

librarians). 

or 

LIBS 243 Administration of Library Work with Children 
and Young People (for public librarians). 
Related Library Science courses: 

LIBS 125 Non-book Materials as Library Resources. 



The School of Library Science 



15 



LIBS 145 Instructional Materials Center: Organization 
and Administration. 
The School of Education offers a full range of graduate studies 
in the history and philosophy of education and in teaching 
methods. Relevant courses are also available in such fields as 
folklore, music, and psychology. 

Classification and Indexing 

Basic Library Science course: 

LIBS 251 Advanced Cataloging and Classification. 
Related Library Science courses: 

LIBS 103 (COMP 119) Information Systems in Language 
Research. 

LIBS 115 (COMP 171) Natural Language Processing. 
LIBS 172 (COMP 172) Information Retrieval. 
LIBS 215 Bibliography. 
LIBS 255 Automating Information Systems. 
LIBS 344 Administration of Archives and Manuscript 
Collections. 

Information Systems 

Basic Library Science courses: 

LIBS 103 (COMP 119) Information Systems in 

Language Research. 

LIBS 115 (COMP 171) Natural Language Processing. 

LIBS 172 (COMP 172) Information Retrieval. 

LIBS 222 Science Literature. 

LIBS 255 Automating Information Systems. 
Related courses are available in the Computer Science Depart- 
ment. 

Rare Books 

Basic Library Science course: 

LIBS 349 Seminar in Rare Book Collections. 
Related Library Science courses: 

LIBS 105 History of Books and Printing. 

LIBS 107 Contemporary Publishing and the Book 
Industry. 

LIBS 108 History of Libraries. 

LIBS 215 Bibliography. 

LIBS 262 Library Resources and Collections. 



16 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



LIBS 344 Administration of Archives and Manuscript 
Collections. 

LIBS 345 Seminar in Fine Arts Librarianship. 
The Departments of Classics, English, Germanic Languages, 
and Romance Languages offer a full range of graduate studies 
in literature and language relevant to the interests of the 
curator of rare books. Special courses in bibliography include: 

ENGL 298 Bibliography and Methodology. 

FREN 205 French Proseminar. 

MUSI 101 Introduction to Musicology and Music 
Bibliography. 

SPAN 205 Proseminar in Spanish. 

Theology 

Basic Library Science course: 

LIBS 347 Seminar in Theological Librarianship. 
Related Library Science courses: 

LIBS 215 Bibliography. 

LIBS 224 Humanities Literature. 
The Department of Religion of The University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill and the Department of Religion and Divinity 
School of Duke University offer a full range of graduate studies 
in the history of religion, systematic and doctrinal theology, 
ethics, and biblical criticism. 

OTHER PROGRAMS 

School Librarianship: A twelve semester hour program meeting 
the North Carolina requirements for a certificate as a Teacher- 
Librarian, and an eighteen semester hour program for a certificate 
as a School Librarian are offered. The Teacher-Librarian certificate 
requires the completion of four courses, Library Science 110, 125, 
145, and either 122 or 123 (depending on the school level at 
which the student plans to work); if taken in summers only, these 
four courses may be completed in two terms, or the equivalent 
of a single summer session. The School Librarian certificate re- 
quires the completion of six courses, Library Science 110, 122, 
123, 125, 145, and 150; if taken in summers only, these courses re- 
quire one and one-half summer sessions (three summer terms) 
to complete. 

Special Study: When there is space available in regularly-scheduled 
classes, the School permits those who qualify for admission as 



The School of Library Science 



17 



special students to register for courses for which they have com- 
pleted the necessary prerequisites or their equivalent. A special 
student may not complete more than 18 semester hours of study 
unless he qualifies for admission as a graduate student, nor will 
he be permitted to continue his registration if he fails to maintain 
a scholarship average of C or higher. 

Continuing Education: In a rapidly changing world the School ac- 
cepts continuing education for librarianship as one of its basic 
objectives. Advanced courses for current students and practicing 
librarians are scheduled at times when they are beneficial to both. 
The School encourages librarians in North Carolina to write for 
information on such courses. Enrollment for these courses may be 
made through the Evening College. Individual programs of study 
may also be arranged when faculty are available for specialized 
subjects. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

Applicants should specify for which session and for which program 
they are seeking admission.- the program leading to the degree of 
Master of Science in Library Science, the School Librarianship 
Program, or special study. If application is being made for ad- 
mission to the summer session, the applicant should also indicate 
whether he intends to pursue his course of study in summers only 
or to continue his work in succeeding fall and spring semesters. 

Since credentials (including academic transcripts and scores on 
the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examination 1 ) and refer- 
ences must be assembled before an application can be reviewed, it 
is important that all applications be submitted at the earliest pos- 
sible date in order that action on them can be completed before 
enrollment quotas are filled. Students who plan to attend only the 
summer sessions are especially urged to make early application or 
to notify the School of their intention to continue a program of study 
begun in a previous summer session, since summer admissions, 
particularly of students in the School Librarianship Program and 
other special students, may, as early as the middle of May, fill 
registration quotas established for the courses to be offered. 

The University has established terminal dates for applying for 
admission to graduate degree programs, including the M.S. in L.S., 

1. Information about the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examination is 
sent to those who request application forms. It may be secured from the Educational 
Testing Service, P. O. Box 955, Princeton, N.J. 08540, or its Pacific Coast Office, 1947 
Center St., Berkeley, Calif. 94704. The examination is administered several times 
yearly at some 3,000 centers throughout the United States. Applicants should note 
that the processing of the GRE scores will require at least one month. 



18 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



as follows: for the fall semester, July 1; for the spring semester, 
November 1; for the summer session, first term, May 19; second 
term, June 23. 

An interview with a member of the faculty of the School, or 
with a librarian designated by the School, may be required of any 
applicant. Members of the faculty and staff may be consulted 
about admission requirements and program schedules by appoint- 
ment, arranged through the School Office. Office hours are main- 
tained, 8:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday. 

At intervals during the year, completed applications are ex- 
amined and voted upon. The Graduate School notifies applicants of 
its action on all applications for admission. Requests for applica- 
tion blanks and for further information should be made to Miss Jean 
Freeman, Assistant to the Dean, The School of Library Science, 
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
27514. 

A non-refundable application fee of $10.00 must be submitted 
with the application for admission. An applicant who has been 
offered admission reserves his place by the payment of a $100.00 
non-refundable deposit which is credited toward the first semester's 
tuition. 

An advance deposit of fifty dollars ($50.00) is required to be 
made by each student enrolled for the regular academic year who 
intends to return for the succeeding academic year. The fee shall 
be paid during the last regular term of the academic year preceding 
the academic year for which the deposit is being paid. 

Time of Entrance 

Applicants may enter the School at the beginning of any term, 
but the beginning of the summer session or fall semester is recom- 
mended since the full range of basic courses is offered at those 
times. The student who enters in the spring semester or second 
summer session may discover that the variety of elective courses 
available to him later in his program is limited. Students who 
attend during only the summer sessions may find their choice of 
electives somewhat circumscribed. 

Registration for credit is limited to the first four days of 
instruction in any term, unless the late registration is approved by 
the instructor concerned and the Dean of the School of Library 
Science. 



The School of Library Science 



19 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN LIBRARY 
SCIENCE DEGREE 

Admission to the Program 

Requirements for Admission: 

(1) A bachelor's degree from an accredited college or univer- 
sity in this country or its equivalent — based on a four year 
curriculum— from a foreign institution. 

(2) Average grade of B (3 on a 4 point scale) or better in the 
over-all college program as well as in the major field of 
study. 

(3) A minimum of seven semesters (102 semester hours) of 
undergraduate work in the liberal arts and sciences, ex- 
clusive of professional courses. For certain library positions, 
thorough training in a professional area is essential, but it 
should be in addition to rather than as a part of the under- 
graduate liberal arts preparation. It is possible that an ap- 
plicant's college degree will not be recognized if his course 
work included undue proportion of vocational or profes- 
sional subjects such as library science, education, home 
economics, or applied art or music. 

(4) Acceptable scores (900-1000) on the Aptitude Test of the 
Graduate Record Examination. 

Applicants whose native language is not English are required 
to submit scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) in addition to the usual requirements. 

Meeting all the stated requirements for admission will not 
necessarily ensure actual admittance to the master's program, since 
the University imposes restrictions on the number of students per- 
mitted to enroll in the School of Library Science. Nor does failure 
to meet all of the stated requirements necessarily imply rejection. 
Each year a limited number of students is admitted provisionally 
on the basis of high motivation, unusual promise for the profession, 
or the possession of special characteristics needed in librarianship. 

Course Requirements 

The program for the Master of Science degree requires that the 
student complete thirty-nine semester hours of advanced work 
beyond the baccalaureate degree. A fifteen-hour core curriculum, 
or its equivalent, is prescribed for all students. This includes Library 
Science courses numbered 100, 110, 120, 130, and 150. Also required 



20 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



are Library Science 201 and Library Science 231 or 232 or 241. Addi- 
tional courses — Library Science electives or approved courses in 
other subject fields — will be chosen through consultation with a 
faculty adviser according to the needs and experience of the student 
in order to complete the thirty-nine hour requirement. The student 
usually can complete his program in a calendar year if he takes 
the normal number of classes during the winter semesters and the 
two summer terms. 

Transfer of up to six semester hours of graduate credit from 
approved institutions may be permitted in accordance with Gradu- 
ate School regulations. A student should initiate any request for ap- 
proval of transfer credit with his faculty adviser at the time he 
plans his program of study. With permission from his adviser and 
the Dean, a student may elect to take graduate courses at the other 
campuses of the University or at Duke University. 

A student whose previous preparation includes academic work 
deemed to be the equivalent of oYie or more courses in the pre- 
scribed core curriculum may be permitted to substitute other 
courses suitable to his objective and needs. The faculty will deter- 
mine equivalency of such courses by evaluation of the student's 
record, by examination, or by both. In general, the School will 
accept as equivalent, library science courses completed at the 
graduate level in programs of study accredited by the American 
Library Association. 

Students who have completed a master's or doctor's degree in 
another discipline at the time of their admission to the School 
will normally follow the prescribed program except that their quali- 
fication for the Master of Science in Library Science degree may 
be simplified somewhat because of their advanced work. Minimum 
requirements for such students will include completion of not less 
than thirty semester hours of graduate work for the degree, includ- 
ing the prescribed courses in Library Science, and meeting in full 
the Graduate School requirements for residence, foreign language 
competence, and transfer of credit. 

The library science content of a student's program, including 
courses taken for advanced undergraduate as well as for graduate 
credit, shall aggregate not less than thirty-three semester hours. 

Other Requirements 

Students who expect to receive the M.S. in L.S. degree must, within 
a period of five years, fulfill the following requirements: 



The School of Library Science 



21 



(1) Complete all course work, including the required research 
paper. 

(2) Demonstrate a reading knowledge of one foreign language 
by either (a) passing the examination administered by the Edu- 
cational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, (b) successfully 
completing the second semester of a special two-semester course 
numbered 101X and 102X on this campus, (c) having received an 
average grade of B on 12 semester credit hours of the language at 
the undergraduate level, or (d) submitting evidence, acceptable to 
the Admissions Committee of the School, of knowledge equivalent 
to that of (c), above. 

(3) Complete two semesters of residence (as described in the 
Catalogue of the Graduate School). 

(4) Remove any provisions of admission. 

(5) Be admitted to candidacy (by filing an acceptable applica- 
tion, early in the final semester of residence). 

(6) Complete a satisfactory comprehensive examination in the 
field of library science. 

HEALTH AND RECREATION 

All students are required to report to the University Physicians for 
a physical examination during the period of their first registration. 
The health of the student community is cared for by a staff of 
physicians and nurses. The gymnasiums, swimming pools, and 
athletic fields, including tennis courts, are available for exercise 
and recreation under the supervision of the Department of Physical 
Education. 

AWARDING OF DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

The University grants the degree of Master of Science in Library 
Science to students who satisfactorily complete the prescribed 
curriculum for that degree. The North Carolina State Department 
of Public Instruction issues certificates to those completing the 
school library program. 

SCHOLARSHIP AND STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

The School of Library Science has available a few scholarships 
which cover the cost of tuition. The awards are made on the basis 
of college record, GRE scores, foreign language proficiency, and 
personal qualifications for library work. 



22 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill j 

The Susan Grey Akers Scholarship was established in 1951 by 
the University of North Carolina School of Library Science Alumni 
Association as a tribute to Dr. Akers, the Director and Dean of the 
School from 1932 to 1954. It is awarded to an applicant for graduate 
work in library science at The University of North Carolina at \ 
Chapel Hill. 

The North Carolina Library Association provides a memorial 
scholarship fund available to residents of the state. In addition, 
special scholarships are occasionally available such as The H. W. 
Wilson Scholarship, The Joseph Ruzicka Scholarship, and the Spe- 
cial Libraries Association Scholarship. 

For information as to loan funds, address The Student Aid 
Office, 300 Vance Hall, The University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514. 

COMPUTER FACILITIES 

There are two very large computers available for use by the stu- ] 
dents and faculty of the School: one is an IBM 360/75, the other is 
an IBM 370/165. Both are accessible from equipment in the base- 
ment of Manning Hall which the School shares with the Institute 
for Research in Social Science. Library School students and faculty 
have access to the Institute's key-punch machines, terminals, and 
other hardware; staff members of the Institute give advice in re- 
lation to programming and the processing of information. 

The School of Library Science has a file of Machine-Readable 
Cataloging (MARC) records from the Library of Congress which 
students make use of. Two MARC files often used for student 
projects are bibliographic records for (a) a random mix of 330 
monographs and (b) a collection of 500 items on the subject of 
library and information science. A close alliance with the auto- 
mated Population Center Library on campus and instruction in and 
use of the "Statistical Package for Social Sciences" also support 
the program of the School. 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS 

In cooperation with the University Library, the School now has 
available a number of graduate assistantships carrying an annual 
stipend of $2,600 for award to graduate students. These are awarded 
annually in June, July, or September and may be renewed for a 
second year at an increased stipend of $3,100. Graduate Assist- 
ants hold 12-month appointments on the library staff and are re- 



The School of Library Science 



23 



quired to work 20 hours weekly. Assistants may not register for 
more than 9 semester hours during any regular semester nor for 
more than 3 semester hours in any term of the summer session and 
will therefore require two academic years and one summer session 
to complete degree requirements as a rule. Applications for these 
assistantships must be filed by February 1. Announcement of ap- 
pointments will be made during April. Applications filed later than 
February 1 will be considered only when additional or substitute 
assistant appointments are available. 

WORK-STUDY PLAN 

If a student can finance his first semester and then locate a full- 
time position, it will be possible for him to finance and complete 
the program leading to the degree of M.S. in L.S. in two and one- 
half years by means of the work-study plan. This would enable the 
student to give full time to his studies his first semester, com- 
pleting all his core courses. For the remaining semesters and 
summer sessions he would take one course (three semester hours) 
each semester and summer term, completing the requirements for 
the degree in two and one-half years. 

The plan outlined above applies to students for whom no 
special conditions for admission are prescribed. Any special cir- 
cumstances in an individual case will result in some modifications 
in the length of time suggested. 

Although the School does not undertake to find employment 
for work-study students, it will assist them in locating positions 
whenever possible. 

PLACEMENT 

The School of Library Science wishes to assist its graduates in 
securing professional employment. To this end, the School works 
closely with the University's Placement Service, which prepares 
credentials and maintains complete records for all graduates of 
the School who register with that office. 

All students who desire placement services from the School 
should register with the Placement Service early in their second 
semester of residence. The faculty of the School cooperates in 
the preparation of all credentials and writes special letters of 
recommendation when they are needed. 

Alumni of the School are urged to register with the University's 
Placement Service, completing the necessary forms, when they 



24 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



wish to change positions. Requests for these forms should be 
addressed to the Director of Placement, 204 Gardner Hall, The 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
27514. They are also invited to write to the Assistant to the Dean, 
School of Library Science, so that they can be informed of appro- 
priate openings which come to the attention of the faculty. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Requests for records of course work completed in the School of 
Library Science should be addressed to the Transcript Clerk, Office 
of Records and Registration, The University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514. 

STUDENT PARTICIPATION IN PLANNING FOR THE SCHOOL 

Students are encouraged to work with the faculty both in insuring 
that the School of Library Science provides a stimulating environ- 
ment for learning and also in planning for the future development 
of the School. There is an active Library Science Student Associ- 
ation, and students are regularly appointed, along with the faculty, 
as members of the School's various committees, 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Association holds an annual business and social meeting in 
Chapel Hill and a social meeting in connection with the American 
Library Association's annual conference. The Association publishes 
a semi-annual bulletin carrying news of the School and the alumni. 
It has also established a scholarship fund for students in the School. 

BETA PHI MU 

Epsilon chapter of Beta Phi Mu, international honorary fraternity in 
library science, is located at The University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. To be eligible for membership, a student must main- 
tain an academic average equal to B plus or better, have shown 
professional promise, and be recommended by the faculty. 

REGULAR SESSION EXPENSES 

University Fees 1 Residents of N. C. 

Tuition per semester $112.50 

Fees $ 96.50 

Total for each semester $209.00 

1. Notice is given that upon proper authorization any fees may be changed at 
any time. 



The School of Library Science 



25 



Nonresidents of North Carolina substitute $900.00 tuition in the 
above list. 

Students who register for less than a full load of course work 
are charged tuition at the following rates: 

One to three semester hours one-third tuition 

Four to six semester hours two-thirds tuition 

Seven or more hours full tuition 

Tuition and fees are assessed on a semester basis and are due 
at the beginning of each term. Payment should be made in advance 
or by the end of a pay period established at the beginning of each 
term. Accounts not paid by the end of the pay period are subject 
to a late payment fee. 

Room rent is payable in advance for each term. 

Other Expenses 

Textbooks and supplies, about $35.00-$60.00 

RESIDENCE STATUS FOR TUITION PAYMENT- 

1. General. The tuition charge for legal residents of North 
Carolina is less than for nonresidents. To qualify for in-state tuition, 
a legal resident must have maintained his domicile in North Caro- 
lina for at least the twelve months next preceding the date of first 
enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution of higher education 
in this state. 3 Student status in an institution of higher education in 
this state shall not constitute eligibility for residence to qualify 
said student for in-state tuition. 

2. Minors: A minor is any person who has not reached the 
age of eighteen years. 4 The legal residence of a person under 
eighteen years of age at the time of his first enrollment in an 
institution of higher education in this state is that of his parents, 
surviving parent, or legal guardian. In cases where parents are 

2. These regulations, as amended on August 13, 1971, shall be applicable with 
respect to tuition payments coming due after said date. 

3. The reference in this sentence to "twelve months" formerly read "six months"; 
Chapter 845 of the 1971 Session Laws, which was ratified on July 13, 1971, made the 
change from "six months" to "twelve months." The office of the Attorney General 
has rendered the following opinion: 

'The eligibility of all students who have applied and have been accepted by state- 
supported institutions of higher education prior to July 13, 1971, shall be determined 
upon the individual having maintained his domicile in North Carolina for at least the 
six months next preceding the date of first enrollment or re-enrollment in an insti- 
tution of higher education in this State. The twelve-month requirement as provided 
for in Chapter 845 of the 1971 Session Laws does not apply to any individual who 
applied for admission and was accepted by a state-supported institution of higher 
education prior to July 13, 1971. The student already enrolled as an in-state student, 
qualifying as such by compliance with the six-month requirement prior to July 13, 
1971, shall retain in-state status.' 

4. Chapter 585 of the 1971 Session Laws, which became effective on July 5, 1971, 
changed the age of adulthood from twenty-one years to eighteen years. 



26 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



divorced or legally separated, the legal residence of the father will 
control unless custody of the minor has been awarded by court 
to the mother or to a legal guardian other than a parent. No claim 
of residence in North Carolina based upon residence of a guardian 
in North Carolina will be considered if either parent is living unless 
the action of the court appointing the guardian antedates the 
student's first enrollment in a North Carolina institution of higher 
education by at least twelve months. 

3. Adults: An adult is any person who has reached the age of 
eighteen years. Persons, eighteen or more years of age at the time 
of first enrollment in an institution of higher education, are respon- 
sible for establishing their own domicile. Persons reaching the age 
of eighteen, whose parents are and have been domiciled in North 
Carolina for at least the preceding twelve months, retain North 
Carolina residence for tuition payment purposes until domicile in 
North Carolina is abandoned. If North Carolina residence is aban- 
doned by an adult, maintenance of North Carolina domicile for 
twelve months as a non-student is required to regain in-state status 
for tuition payment purposes. 

4. Married Students: The legal residence of a wife follows that 
of her husband, except that a woman currently enrolled as an 
in-state student in an institution of higher education may continue 
as a resident even though she marries a nonresident. If the hus- 
band is a nonresident and separation or divorce occurs, the woman 
may qualify for in-state tuition after establishing her domicile in 
North Carolina for at least twelve months as a non-student. 

5. Military Personnel: No person shall lose his in-state resident 
status by serving in the Armed Forces outside of the State of North 
Carolina. A member of the Armed Forces may obtain in-state resi- 
dence status for himself, his spouse, or his children after maintain- 
ing his domicile in North Carolina for at least the twelve months 
next preceding his or their enrollment or re-enrollment in an insti- 
tution of higher education in this state. 

6. Aliens: Aliens lawfully admitted to the United States for 
permanent residence may establish North Carolina residence in 
the same manner as any other nonresident. 

7. Property and Taxes: Ownership of property in or payment of 
taxes to the State of North Carolina apart from legal residence will 
not qualify one for the in-state tuition rate. 



The School of Library Science 



27 



8. Change of Status: The residence status of any student is 
determined as of the time of his first enrollment in an institution 
of higher education in North Carolina except: (a) in the case of a 
nonresident student at the time of first enrollment who has sub- 
sequently maintained domicile as a non-student for at least twelve 
consecutive months and (b) in the case of a resident who abandons 
his legal residence in North Carolina. In either case, the appro- 
priate tuition rate will become effective at the beginning of the 
first subsequent term enrolled. 

9. Responsibility of Students: Any student or prospective stu- 
dent in doubt concerning his residence status must bear the 
responsibility for securing a ruling by stating his case in writing to 
the admissions officer. The student who, due to subsequent events, 
becomes eligible for a change in classification, whether from out- 
of-state to in-state or the reverse, has the responsibility of immedi- 
ately informing the Office of Admissions of this circumstance in 
writing. Failure to give complete and correct information regarding 
residence constitutes grounds for disciplinary action. 

10. Appeals of Rulings of Admission Officers: Any student or 
prospective student may appeal the ruling of the admissions officer 
in writing to the Chancellor of the institution. The Chancellor may 
use any officer or committee which he deems appropriate in review 
of the appeal. Appeal of the Chancellor's ruling may be made to the 
President of the University, such appeals to be filed with the Chan- 
cellor and forwarded by him to the President. 

HOUSING INFORMATION 

The University provides housing for unmarried students in resi- 
dence halls, one of which is reserved for graduate students. The 
cost per academic year is $330-$650 according to the current rental 
schedule. (It is expected that rent will be increased for the next 
year). Laundry and linen services are available at reasonable rates. 
Further information may be found in the Graduate School Cata- 
logue. Dining facilities are operated in locations convenient to 
residence halls and meals are offered at reasonable rates. 

The University has several hundred apartments available for 
married students, consisting of one bedroom and two bedroom 
units. Rent is approximately $82 to $110 per month, while rent 
in the older prefabricated units is considerably lower. It is a general 
policy of the University to grant priority to married graduate stu- 



28 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



dents. Early application to the Manager of Married Student Housing 
is recommended. 

Apart from University housing, there are privately operated 
residence halls in University Square. These buildings have a 
cafeteria dining commons, and the fee charged includes room and 
board. Arrangements for these accommodations should be made 
directly with the Granville Towers Business Office, University 
Square, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514. 

SUMMER SESSION EXPENSES 
FOR ONE TERM 

University Fees Residents of N. C. 

Tuition $ 45.00 

Fees 35.50 

Total $ 80.50 

Nonresidents of North Carolina substitute $360.00 tuition in 
the above list. 

Other Expenses 

Books and supplies, about $35.00-$60.00 

Rooms 

Women: For each summer term the rental rate is $70.00 for a 
double room and $93.00 for a single room. 

In making room reservation for either of the two summer terms, 
students are required to pay the amount of the entire room rent for 
one term at the time application is made for room reservation. 
Residence halls available for use during the summer sessions 
will be listed on the back of the room reservation card. Rent for 
a summer term is refundable only if cancellation is received at 
least one week prior to the registration date of either summer term. 

Men: Residence Hall Rooms: Single $78.00 per person 

Double $58.00 per person 



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29 



POLICIES, PROCEDURES, AND DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS 
IN CASES OF DISRUPTION OF EDUCATIONAL PROCESS 

The following statement has been incorporated in the Bylaws 
of the Board of Trustees of the University, and is quoted for the 
information of all members of the University Community. 

Section 5-1. Policies Relating to Disruptive Conduct 

The University of North Carolina has long honored the right of free discus- 
sion and expression, peaceful picketing and demonstrations, the right to 
petition and peaceably to assemble. That these rights are a part of the fabric 
of this institution is not questioned. They must remain secure. It is equally 
clear, however, that in a community of learning willful disruption of the educa- 
tional process, destruction of property, and interference with the rights of 
other members of the community cannot be tolerated. Accordingly, it shall 
be the policy of the University to deal with any such disruption, destruction or 
interference promptly and effectively, but also fairly and impartially without 
regard to race, religion, sex or political beliefs. 

Section 5-2. Definition of Disruptive Conduct 

(a) Any faculty member (the term "faculty member," wherever used in this 
Chapter V, shall include regular faculty members, full-time instructors, lec- 
turers, and all other persons exempt from the North Carolina State Personnel 
System [Chapter 126 of the General Statutes as amended] who receive compen- 
sation for teaching, or other instructional functions, or research at the Univer- 
sity), any graduate student engaged in the instructional program, or any student 
who, with the intent to obstruct or disrupt any normal operation or function of 
the University or any of its component institutions, engages, or incites others to 
engage, in individual or collective conduct which destroys or significantly 
damages any University property, or which impairs or threatens impairment 
of the physical well-being of any member of the University community, or 
which, because of its violent, forceful, threatening or intimidating nature or 
because it restrains freedom of lawful movement, otherwise prevents any 
member of the University community from conducting his normal activities 
within the University, shall be subject to prompt and approprite disciplinary 
action, which may include suspension, expulsion, discharge or dismissal from 
the University. 

The following, while not intended to be exclusive, illustrate the offenses 
encompassed herein, when done for the purpose of obstructing or disrupting 
any normal operation or function of the University or any of its component 
institutions: (1) occupation of any University building or part thereof with 
intent to deprive others of its normal use; (2) blocking the entrance or exit 
of any University building or corridor or room therein with intent to deprive 
others of lawful access to or from, or use of, said building or corridor or room; 
(3) setting fire to or by any other means destroying or substantially damaging 
any University building or property, or the property of others on University 
premises; (4) any possession or display of, or attempt or threat to use, for any 
unlawful purpose, any weapon, dangerous instrument, explosive, or inflammable 
material in any University building or on any University campus; (5) prevention 
of, or attempt to prevent by physical act, the attending, convening, continua- 



30 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



tion or orderly conduct of any University class or activity or of any lawful 
meeting or assembly in any University building or on any University campus; 
and (6) blocking normal pedestrian or vehicular traffic on or into any University 
campus. 

(b) Any person engaged in the instructional program who fails or refuses 
to carry out validly assigned duties, with the intent to obstruct or disrupt any 1 
normal operation or function of the University or any of its component institu- 
tions, shall be subject to prompt and appropriate disciplinary action under 1 
this Chapter V if (but only if) his status is such that he is not subject to the 
provisions of Section 4-3 of Chapter IV. 

Section 5-3. Responsibilities of Chancellors 

(a) When any Chancellor has cause to believe that any of the provisions I 
of this Chapter V have been violated, he shall forthwith investigate or cause to 

be investigated the occurrence, and upon identification of the parties involved I 
shall promptly determine whether any charge is to be made with respect | 
thereto. 

(b) If he decides that a charge is to be made, he shall, within thirty (30) days 
after he has information as to the identity of the alleged perpetrator of the j 
offense but in no event more than twelve (12) months after the occurrence of 
the alleged offense, (i) refer the case to the appropriate existing University 
judicial body, or (ii) refer the matter to a Hearing Committee drawn from a 
previously selected Hearings Panel which, under this option, is required to 
implement action for violation of Section 5-2 (a) or (b) of this Chapter. If the ■ 
case is referred to an existing University judicial body under (i) above, the 
procedural rules of that body shall be followed, and subsections (c) through 

(f) below shall not be applicable. If the matter is referred to a Hearing Com- 
mittee under (ii) above, the procedural rules prescribed in subsections (c) 
through (f) below shall be followed. 

(c) The accused shall be given written notice by personal service or regis- 
tered mail, return receipt requested, stating: 

(1) The specific violations of this Chapter V with which the accused is 
charged. 

(2) The designated time and place of the hearing on the charge by the 
Hearing Committee, which time shall be not earlier than seven (7) nor 
later than ten (10) days following receipt of the notice. 

(3) That the accused shall be entitled to the presumption of innocence 
until found guilty, the right to retain counsel, the right to present the 
testimony of witnesses and other evidence, the right to cross-examine all 
witnesses against him, the right to examine all documents and demonstra- 
tive evidence adverse to him, and the right to a transcript of the pro- 
ceedings of the hearing. 

(d) The Hearing Committee shall determine the guilt or innocence of the 
accused. If the person charged is found guilty, the Hearing Committee shall 
recommend to the Chancellor such discipline as said body determines to be 
appropriate. After considering such recommendation the Chancellor shall pre- 
scribe such discipline as he deems proper. In any event, whether the person 
is found guilty or not guilty, a written report shall be made by the Chancellor 
to the President within ten (10) days. 



The School of Library Science 



31 



(e) Any person found guilty shall have ten (10) days after notice of such 
findings in which to appeal to the President of the University. Such an appeal 
if taken shall be upon the grounds set forth in Section 5-5. 

(f) Any accused person who, without good cause, shall fail to appear at the 
time and place fixed for the hearing of his case by the Hearing Committee 
shall be suspended indefinitely or discharged from University employment. 

(g) A Chancellor, unless so ordered or otherwise prevented by court, shall 
( not be precluded from carrying out his duties under this Chapter V by reason 

of any pending action in any State or Federal court. Should a delay occur in 
■< prosecuting the charge against the accused because the accused or witnesses 
that may be necessary to a determination of the charge are involved in State 
or Federal court actions, the time limitations set forth above in this Section 
I 5-3 shall not apply. 

(h) Conviction in any State or Federal court shall not preclude the Uni- 
I versity or any of its officers from exercising disciplinary action in any offense 
f referred to in this Chapter V. 

(i) Nothing contained in this Chapter V shall preclude the President or any 
I Chancellor from taking any other steps, including injunctive relief or other 

legal action, which he may deem advisable to protect the best interests of the 
I University. 

Section 5-4. Aggravated Acts or Threatened Repetition of Acts 

(a) The Chancellor of each of the component institutions of the University 
shall appoint an Emergency Consultative Panel which shall be composed of not 
less than three (3) nor more than five (5) faculty members and not less than 
three (3) nor more than five (5) students who shall be available to advise with 
the Chancellor in any emergency. No member of such Panel shall serve for 
more than one (1) year unless he be reappointed by the Chancellor. The Chan- 
cellor may make appointments, either temporary or for a full year, to fill any 
vacancies which may exisit on the Panel. 

(b) If, in the judgment of the Chancellor, there is clear and convincing 
evidence that a person has committed any of the acts prohibited under this 
Chapter V which, because of the aggravated character or probable repetition 

I of such act or acts, necessitates immediate action to protect the University 
from substantial interference with any of its orderly operations or functions, 

i or to prevent threats to or acts which endanger life or property, the Chancellor, 
with the concurrence as hereinafter provided of the Emergency Consultative 
Panel established pursuant to (a) above, may forthwith suspend such person 
from the University and bar him from the University campus; provided, how- 
ever, that in the event of such suspension the person suspended shall be 
given written notice of the reason for his suspension, either personally or by 
registered mail addressed to his last known addresses, and shall be afforded a 
prompt hearing, which, if requested, shall be commenced within ten (10) days 
of the suspension. Except for purposes of attending personally any hearings 
conducted under this Chapter V, the bar against the appearance of the ac- 
cused on the University campus shall remain in effect until final judgment 
has been rendered in his case and all appellant proceedings have been con- 
cluded, unless such restriction is earlier lifted by written notice from the 
Chancellor. 



32 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



(c) A quorum of the Emergency Consultative Panel provided for in (a) 
above shall consist of not less than four (4) of its members, and the required 
concurrence shall have been obtained if a majority of such quorum shall indi- 
cate their concurrence. The Chancellor shall meet personally with members 
of such Panel at the time he seeks concurrence, if it is feasible to do so. 
However, if the circumstances are such that the Chancellor deems it not to be 
feasible to personally assemble such members, then he may communicate 
with them or the required number of them individually by telephone or by 
such other means as he may choose to employ, in which he may proceed as 
provided in (b) above after the required majority of such members have com- 
municated their concurrence to him. 

(d) In the Chancellor's absence or inability to act, the President may 
exercise the powers of the Chancellor specified in this Section 5-4 in the 
same manner and to the same extent as could the Chancellor but for such 
absence or inability to act. 

Section 5-5. Right of Appeal 

Any person found guilty of violating the provisions of this Chapter V by 
the Hearing Committee referred to in Section 5-3 shall have the right to appeal 
the finding and the discipline imposed upon him to the President of the Uni- 
versity. Any such appeal shall be in writing, shall be based solely upon the 
record, and shall be limited to one or more of the following grounds: 

(1) That the finding is not supported by substantial evidence; 

(2) That a fair hearing was not accorded the accused; or 

(3) That the discipline imposed was excessive or inappropriate. 

It shall be the responsibility of the President to make prompt disposition of 
all such appeals, and his decision shall be rendered within thirty (30) days 
after receipt of the complete record on appeal. 

Section 5-6. No Amnesty 

No administrative official, faculty member, or student of the University 
shall have authority to grant amnesty or to make any promise as to prosecution 
or non-prosecution in any court, State or Federal, or before any student, faculty, 
administrative, or Trustee committee to any person charged with or suspected 
of violating Section 5-2 (a) or (b) of these Bylaws. 

Section 5-7. Publication 

The provisions of this Chapter V shall be given wide dissemination in such 
manner as the President or Chancellors may deem advisable, and shall be 
printed in the official catalogues which may be issued by each component 
institution of the University. 



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PROCEDURES FOR USE IN CASE OF REFUSAL BY GRADUATE 
STUDENT SERVICE APPOINTEES (WHO ARE NOT SUBJECT TO 
CODE SECTION 4-3) TO PERFORM VALIDLY ASSIGNED DUTIES 

The following statement has been promulgated by the University 
Administration and is quoted for the information of all members of 
the University Community. 

In the event that any graduate student fails or refuses to carry 
out validly assigned duties with the intent to obstruct or disrupt any 
normal operation or function of the University, the procedures given 
below will be followed. In these procedures the term "dean" identi- 
fies the deans of professional schools. 

I. Administrative Procedures 

1. The dean or department chairman in whose school or department the 
graduate student is appointed will immediately inquire into the alleged 
conduct. He shall, in writing, notify the graduate student involved that 
he is beginning an inquiry into the alleged conduct, which shall be 
briefly described. On the basis of his inquiry, he shall make a concise 
written finding of fact with respect to whether it appears that there did 
occur a failure or refusal to carry out validly assigned duties with the 
intent to obstruct or disrupt any normal operation or function of the 
University. He shall transmit one copy of the finding to the Chancellor 
and one to the graduate student involved. 

2. If the inquiry indicates that the graduate student has failed or refused 
to carry out validly assigned duties with the intent to obstruct or disrupt 
any normal operation or function of the University, then the dean or 
chairman shall suspend the graduate student with pay from all duties 
until (a) the Chancellor has determined that no charge is to be made 
with respect thereto or (b) a final decision with respect thereto has been 
reached following a hearing before the body to which the matter is 
referred by the Chancellor. 

3. If the Chancellor decides that a charge is to be made with respect to the 
matter and that it is to be referred to the appropriate exisiting Uni- 
versity judicial body (rather than to the Hearing Committee referred 
to in Code Section 5-3), it shall be handled in the manner set forth 
below. 

II. Hearing Procedures 

1. The dean or chairman shall convene by written directive the Grievance 
Committee set up by faculty action on January 10, 1969 (see Appendix B 
of Faculty Legislation). 

2. The dean or chairman shall, in writing, notify the graduate student of 
the convening of the hearing committee and shall provide the chairman 
of the hearing committee with a concise written summary of the charges 
of violation based upon the findings of the inquiry. 



34 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

3. Upon convening of the hearing committee and receipt of the written 
charges, the chairman of the hearing committee shall forthwith set a 
time and place for the hearing by written notification to the graduate 
student and shall make the necessary arrangements for conducting 
the hearing. Unless manifestly impossible for reasons of specific un- 
fairness to the graduate student or gross inconvenience to members of 
the hearing committee or to necessary witnesses, the hearing shall be 
set to commence not later than five (5) days after receipt by the gradu- 
ate student of the written notice of the convening of the hearing com- 
mittee. Failure on the part of the graduate student to attend the hearing 
without adequate cause shall result in automatic permanent suspension 
without pay. 

4. The hearing shall be conducted on the written charges to determine 
their truth or falsity. The department chairman or dean who initiated 
the proceedings has the responsibility for presenting witnesses or 
documentary evidence to establish the charges. The graduate student 
shall be accorded the right to counsel of his own choosing, to confront 
and cross-examine the witnesses against him, and to examine all docu- 
ments and demonstrative evidence against him. He shall have the right 
to present testimony of witnesses and other evidence in his own behalf. 

5. A complete transcript of the proceedings shall be furnished at the ex- 
pense of the University. 

6. Promptly upon the close of the hearing, the hearing committee shall 
render its decision, and that decision shall be presented in writing to 
the graduate student and his department chairman or dean. 

III. Disciplinary Action and Appeal Procedure 

1. If the decision is adverse to the graduate student, the department chair- 
man or dean who initiated the proceedings shall determine what dis- 
ciplinary action is to be taken. 

2. An appeal may be taken in the manner described in paragraph C of 
Appendix B to the Faculty Legislation on University Government. 

FIREARMS AND OTHER WEAPONS PROHIBITED 

The possession of bowie knives, dirks, daggers, loaded canes, sword 
canes, machetes, pistols, rifles, repeating rifles, shotguns, pump 
guns, or other firearms or explosives upon any University campus 
or in any University owned or operated facility, unless explicitly 
permitted by the appropriate Chancellor or his designated repre- 
sentative in writing, is forbidden. Violation of this prohibition con- 
stitutes grounds for suspension from the University. 

— 



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35 



CURRICULA 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Required Courses 

The Core Curriculum (Library Science 100, 110, 120, 130, and 150) 
201 Methods of Investigation and Research in Librarianship 
231 Theory of Library Administration 
or 

232 Scientific Management of Libraries 
or 

241 Administration and Supervision of Public School Library Systems 
Elective Courses 

Electives may be chosen from the other courses listed on pages 35 through 40, 
and from those in related academic disciplines as recorded in the Catalogue 
of the Graduate School. The program for each student will be determined in 
consultation with his faculty adviser. Degree candidates ordinarily elect at 
least one of the three "literature" courses offered by the School: L.S. 222, 223, 
or 224. No student will be admitted to any elective course until he has com- 
pleted whatever prerequisites have been specified for it. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 1 

Work is valued and credited by semester hours. In the following 
announcements of courses the numbers in parentheses following 
the descriptive titles show the credits allowed in semester hours. 

REGULAR SESSION 

Courses for Undergraduate Students 

292 SURVEY AND EVALUATION OF MATERIALS FOR CHILDREN: EARLY 
CHILDHOOD (3). A survey of materials for children, designed for prospec- 
tive teachers enrolled in the program in Early Childhood Education. 
Three hours a week, fall and spring semesters. Kalp. 

2 93 SURVEY AND EVALUATION OF MATERIALS FOR CHILDREN: INTER- 
MEDIATE GRADES (3). A survey of materials for children, designed for 
prospective teachers enrolled in the program in Intermediate Education. 
Three hours a week, fall and spring semesters. Kalp. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

100 THE LIBRARY IN SOCIETY (3). Concepts and methods Tor assessing the 
adequacy of libraries and information systems in serving their present 
and prospective publics, with attention to librarianship as a profession 

1. The listing of a course in the catalogue does not obligate the University to 
give the course in any particular year. 

2. Not included in the certification program for school librarians; a special 
course for School of Education students. 



36 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

and an introduction to computers and programming. Three hours a week, 
fall and spring semesters. Shearer. 

103 INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN LANGUAGE RESEARCH (Computer Science 
119 (3). Prerequisite, one of Computer Science 16-19, 216X-219X, prefer- 
ably 19 or 219X. Concepts of information and information processing as 
they relate to language research in the humanities and social sciences. 
Hardware and software systems for language research. Programming 
projects required. Three hours a week, spring semester. Dillon. 

105 HISTORY OF BOOKS AND PRINTING (3). A study of the origin and de- 
velopment of the book from earliest times to the nineteenth century. 
Three hours a week, fall semester. Gambee. 

107 CONTEMPORARY PUBLISHING AND THE BOOK INDUSTRY (3). Present- 
day techniques in the production and distribution of the communications 
materials commonly acquired by libraries, studied in the context of their 
historical development particularly during the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. Three hours a week, spring semester. Gambee. 

108 HISTORY OF LIBRARIES (3). The history of libraries and librarianship 
from ancient times to the present. Three hours a week, spring semester. 

McMullen. 

110 BASIC REFERENCE SOURCES AND METHODS (3). Selection, evaluation, 
and use of basic reference materials suitable for school, college, and 
public libraries, Three hours a week, fall semester. Roper. 

115 NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING (Computer Science 171) (3). Pre- 
requisite, one of Computer Science 16-19, 216X-219X. Physiological, psy- 
chological, syntactic and semantic models of natural language; emphasis 
upon implementation on the computer and related hardware of syntactic 
and semantic formalizations. Three hours a week, fall semester. Dillon. 

120 SELECTION OF LIBRARY MATERIALS (3). An introduction to the theory 
and practice of selecting books and other informational materials for 
libraries of all types. Three hours a week, fall semester. London, Mc- 
Mullen. 

122 SELECTION OF BOOKS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR YOUNG PEO- 
PLE (3). A survey of library materials particularly suited to the use of the 
adolescent reader. Three hours a week, fall and spring semesters. Stone. 

123 SELECTION OF BOOKS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR CHILDREN (3). 

A survey of library materials for children including both classic and 
modern titles, with attention to the work of illustrators of books for 
children. Three hours a week, fall and spring semesters. Stone. 

125 NON-BOOK MATERIALS AS LIBRARY RESOURCES (3). Principles of 

selecting, acquiring, organizing, storing, and servicing non-book materials 
in libraries of all types and in materials centers. Emphasis is given to 
those media increasingly important in library collections: motion pic- 
tures, filmstrips, slides, microfilms, disc and tape recordings, pictures, 
and maps. Three hours a week, fall and spring semesters. Gambee. 



The School of Library Science 



37 



130 ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF LIBRARY SERVICES (3). A sys- 
tematic introduction to the organization and operation of library services 
in all kinds of libraries; includes a study of the procedures involved in 
the acquisition, preparation for use, circulation and storage, and servicing 
of library materials. Three hours a week, fall and spring semesters. 
Henkle, Holley, staff. 

145 INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER: ORGANIZATION AND ADMINIS- 
TRATION (3). The school library as a learning resources center, incorporat- 
ing all types of instructional materials, print and non-print, book and 
non-book; multi-media approach to materials for instruction and to 
library services within the school; techniques for organization and 
administration, distribution and accessibility of instructional materials, 
their care and use. Three hours a week, fall semester. Kalp. 

150 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNICAL SERVICES IN LIBRARIES (3). Concepts, 
methods, and problems of obtaining and organizing materials for effective 
use in all types of libraries; including a study of order processes, de- 
scriptive and subject cataloging, and the administration of technical 
services. Three hours a week, fall and spring semesters. Hickey, London. 

172 INFORMATION RETRIEVAL (Computer Science 172) (3). Prerequisite, one 
of Computer Science 16-19, 216X-219X. Study of information retrieval and 
question answering techniques, including document classification, re- 
trieval and evaluation techniques, handling of large data collections, 
and the use of feedback. Three hours a week, spring semester. Weiss. 

Courses for Graduates 

201 METHODS OF INVESTIGATION AND RESEARCH IN LIBRARIANSHIP (3). 
An introduction to research methods and their application to librarian- 
ship; designed to prepare students to select, formulate, and develop 
problems as well as to judge the published reports of the investigation 
of others. A research paper is required. Three hours a week, fall and 
spring semesters. Carpenter. 

204 COMPARATIVE LIBRARIANSHIP (3). Prerequisite, Library Science 100. 
Library and information system characteristics in selected European 
and developing countries; world trends and international cooperation 
in library organization and service. Three hours a week, spring semester. 
London. 

210 LEGAL BIBLIOGRAPHY (3). An introduction to the literature of Anglo- 
American jurisprudence. Emphasis will be be placed on the use of 
reports, statutes, administrative regulations and decisions, treatises, 
periodicals, and indexes as bibliographical tools. (Not offered in 1972- 
1973.) Three hours a week, spring semester. Staff. 

215 BIBLIOGRAPHY (3). Prerequisite, Library Science 110 or equivalent. A 
study of the chief national and trade bibliographies in English and 
foreign languages. Three hours a week, fall and spring semesters. Roper. 



38 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

221 READING INTERESTS AND GUIDANCE OF YOUTH (3). Prerequisites, 
Library Science 122 and 123, or equivalent. A study of reading habits 
and interests of children and young people. Special attention is given 
to readability factors and to the selection of readable materials for 
young readers. (Not offered in 1972-1973.) Three hours a week, spring 
semester. Stone. 

222 SCIENCE LITERATURE (3). Prerequisites, Library Science 110 and 120, 
or equivalent. A survey of the literature in the physical and biological 
sciences, with attention to landmark books, major bibliographic and 
fact sources, and contemporary book and non-book materials in the 
sciences. Three hours a week, fall semester. London. 

223 SOCIAL SCIENCE LITERATURE (3). Prerequisites, Library Science 110 
and 120, or equivalent. A survey of the literature in the various subject 
areas of the social sciences; includes background movements, leaders, 
classics, bibliography, and sources of materials. (Not offered in 1972- 
1973.) Three hours a week, fall and spring semesters. Staff. 

224 HUMANITIES LITERATURE (3). Prerequisites, Library Science 110 and 
120, or equivalent. A survey of the literature of the various subject areas 
in the humanities. Three hours a week, fall and spring semesters. Mc- 

Mullen. 

226b LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING (3). Prerequisite, Library Science 228, 
or equivalent. Training, including research problems, in the use of law 
books and legal materials. Three hours a week, spring semester. Oliver. 

228 PUBLIC DOCUMENTS (3). Prerequisites, Library Science 110 and 120, or 
equivalent. A survey of the major publications of the United States fed- 
eral government, United Nations, United States state governments, and 
British government, with attention to the selection, classification, and 
administration of a document collection. Three hours a week, spring 
semester. Parrott. 

231 THEORY OF LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION (3). Prerequisite, Library Science 
130 or equivalent. Administrative theory and practice as it applies to the 
organization and operation of libraries; includes a study of the govern- 
ment of the library; the planning, organization, direction, and control 
of its activities; public relations; personnel; and finance. Three hours a 
week, fall and spring semesters. Carpenter. 

232 SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT OF LIBRARIES (3). Prerequisite, Library 
Science 130 or equivalent. Principles and techniques of scientific man- 
agement and their application to the improvement of library services. 
(Not offered in 1972-1973.) Three hours a week, spring semester. Dillon. 

241 ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF PUBLIC SCHOOL LIBRARY 
SYSTEMS (3). Prerequisite, Library Science 130 or equivalent. The prin- 
ciples and problems involved in system-wide school library service, to- 
gether with the functions and duties of coordinators and supervisors of 
school libraries. Three hours a week, spring semester. Kalp. 



The School of Library Science 



39 



243 ADMINISTRATION OF LIBRARY WORK WITH CHILDREN AND YOUNG 
PEOPLE (3). Prerequisite, Library Science 130 or equivalent. The ob- 
jectives and organization of public library services to children and young 
people; designed for those who may head children's or young people's 
work in public libraries or who may be administrators of branch libraries. 
(Not offered in 1972-1973.) Three hours a week, spring semester. Kalp. 

246 LIBRARIANSHIP AND THE LAW (3). An introduction to the various areas 
of law relevant to librarianship. Particular attention will be given to 
current legislation relating directly to libraries and librarians. (Not offered 
in 1972-1973.) Three hours a week, spring semester. Staff. 

251 ADVANCED CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION (3). Prerequisite, Li- 
brary Science 150 or equivalent. Study of systems used in the descriptive 
and subject control of library materials, with attention to the theory of 
classification and to contemporary alternatives to traditional library 
cataloging procedures. Three hours a week, spring semester. Hickey. 

255 AUTOMATING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3). Prerequisite, a knowledge 
of PL/ 1 programming equivalent to that required for Library Science 100. 
Principles and techniques of automatic information processing, as ap- 
plied to libraries and information centers, emphasizing current problems 
of design and implementation. Topics include problems in organizing 
and classifying information, automatic language analysis for information 
storage and retrieval, and systems for data base retrieval and selective 
dissemination of information. Three hours a week, spring semester. Dillon. 

262 LIBRARY RESOURCES AND COLLECTIONS (3). Problems associated with 
the development, growth, housing, and maintenance of library collections. 
Three hours a week, spring semester. Orne. 

300 READINGS AND SPECIAL STUDIES IN LIBRARIANSHIP (3). Prerequisite, 
permission of the instructor. Advanced reading, study, and research on 
selected special topics. Three hours a week, time to be arranged. Mem- 
bers of the graduate faculty. 

301 RESEARCH (3). Members of the graduate faculty. 

310 SEMINAR IN SELECTED TOPICS (3). Prerequisite, permission of the 
instructor. Three hours a week, time to be arranged. Members of the 
graduate faculty. 

344 ADMINISTRATION OF ARCHIVES AND MANUSCRIPT COLLECTIONS (3). 
The history, principles, and techniques of acquiring and administering 
public and private archives and manuscript collections. Instruction will 
be supplemented by special lectures and tours of nearby record re- 
positories. Three hours a week, spring semester. Russell. 

345 SEMINAR IN FINE ARTS LIBRARIANSHIP (3). Prerequisites, Library 
Science 110 and 120 or equivalent. A survey of the literature of the fine 
arts, principally the graphic arts, sculpture, and architecture. Special 
problems of the fine arts library, its organization and services. Three 
hours a week, spring semester. Gambee. 



40 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



346 SEMINAR IN LAW LIBRARIANSHIP (3). Prerequisite, permission of the 
instructor. An introduction to the Anglo-American legal system and a 
study of the development of law libraries, their objectives, characteristics, 
and services, with attention to the special problems of selecting, acquir- 
ing, and organizing law materials, and administering law library services. 
Three hours a week, time to be arranged. Oliver. 

347 SEMINAR IN THEOLOGICAL LIBRARIANSHIP (3). Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of the instructor. A study of the specialized problems relating to 
the organization and operation of theological seminary libraries; atten- 
tion is given to bibliographic resources in religion, special theological 
classification systems, and the administrative patterns characteristic 
of autonomous and university-related seminary libraries. Three hours a 
week, spring semester. Hickey. 

348 SEMINAR IN MEDICAL LIBRARIANSHIP (3). An introduction to the 
literature of the bio-medical sciences and to the organization of all 
types of medical libraries, with emphasis upon the problems of adminis- 
tration and technical processing peculiar to medical library service as 
well as the acquisition and use of bibliographical and reference works 
in medicine and allied fields. Three hours a week, spring semester. Ebert. 

349 SEMINAR IN RARE BOOK COLLECTIONS (3). Prerequisite, permission 
of the instructor. A study of the nature and importance of rare books; 
the development and administration of rare book collections; problems 
of acquisition, organization, and service. (Not offered in 1972-1973.) Three 
hours a week, spring semester. Staff. 

352 SEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN ORGANIZING LIBRARY COLLECTIONS (3). 
Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Advanced study of special 
problems in cataloging and classification. The topics considered will 
vary with the special interests of each class group. (Not offered in 1972- 
1973.) Three hours a week, spring semester. London. 

400 GENERAL REGISTRATION (0). 

SUMMER SESSION 

A course in the summer session ordinarily meets ninety 
minutes a day, five times a week. 

Courses for Undergraduate Students 

92* SURVEY AND EVALUATION OF MATERIALS FOR CHILDREN: EARLY 
CHILDHOOD (3). First term. Bush. 

93* SURVEY AND EVALUATION OF MATERIALS FOR CHILDREN: INTER- 
MEDIATE GRADES (3). Second term. Aaron. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

100 THE LIBRARY IN SOCIETY (3). Second term. Shearer. 

105 HISTORY OF BOOKS AND PRINTING (3). First term. Kraus. 



The School of Library Science 41 

108 HISTORY OF LIBRARIES (3). Second term. Gambee. 

110 BASIC REFERENCE SOURCES AND METHODS (3). First term. Roper. 

120 SELECTION OF LIBRARY MATERIALS (3). Second term. Shearer. 

122 SELECTION OF BOOKS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
(3). First term. Stone. 

123 SELECTION OF BOOKS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR CHILDREN (3). 
First term. Stone. 

125 NON-BOOK MATERIALS AS LIBRARY RESOURCES (3). Second term. 

Gambee. 

130 ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF LIBRARY SERVICES (3). First term. 
Bird. 

145 INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER: ORGANIZATION AND ADMINIS- 
TRATION (3). Second term. Aaron. 

150 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNICAL SERVICES IN LIBRARIES (3). Second 
term. Hickey. 

Courses for Graduates 

201 METHODS OF INVESTIGATION AND RESEARCH IN LIBRARIANSHIP (3). 
First term. Carpenter. 

223 SOCIAL SCIENCE LITERATURE (3). First term. Bush. 

231 THEORY OF LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION (3). First term. Carpenter. 

251 ADVANCED CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION (3). Second term. Hickey. 

300 READINGS AND SPECIAL STUDIES IN LIBRARIANSHIP (3). Both terms. 
Staff. 

301 RESEARCH (3). Both terms. Staff. 
400 GENERAL REGISTRATION (0). 



*Not included in the certification program for school librarians; a special course 
tor School of Education students. 



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